Check out the position of your site right NOW http://freeranktracker.top/;Без регистрации бесплатное определение позиций сайта в Google и Yandex

HOW WE DIAGNOSE A SEIZURE AND DECIDE WHAT IT WILL MEAN FOR YOUR CHILD: PROVOKED AND UNPROVOKED SEIZURES

Your child is playing outside when his friend comes banging at the door. “Come quick!” the friend shouts. “Something’s happened to Bobby!” You run and find Bobby on the edge of the playground jerking his arms and legs and making gurgling sounds. “Was that a seizure?” you ask your physician later. “It certainly sounds like one,” she replies. “We have to be concerned that Bobby might have another one. If he does, then he has epilepsy—by definition.” If after talking to Bobby’s friend she learns that Bobby was climbing a tree, fell, and hit his head, she might answer differently. “I think Bobby had a slight concussion and a brief seizure, what we call a ‘post-traumatic seizure.’ These brief seizures after a child hits his head are not uncommon and rarely recur. I think that this is what we call a provoked seizure. I don’t believe he has epilepsy or will have epilepsy.”
It is not the mere occurrence of a seizure but also the circumstances under which the seizure occurs that determine if a child is likely to have more seizures. Furthermore, the child must have two or more seizures or he has not got epilepsy.
If a child has several seizures during an episode of meningitis, or after a head injury, or with diarrhea and dehydration, or with other acute “illnesses,” these seizures are termed “provoked” seizures or “symptomatic” seizures, ones that have a defined cause, just as Jane’s seizure after fainting was a “provoked” seizure. The acute brain disturbance that caused them will disappear or be cured and the seizures should not recur.
Although acute conditions such as a head injury or meningitis can cause permanent damage to the brain, and that damage can later lead to “unprovoked” recurrent seizures—i.e., epilepsy—permanent damage followed later by epilepsy is not a consequence of acute “symptomatic” seizures in children.
*19\208\8*

HOW WE DIAGNOSE A SEIZURE AND DECIDE WHAT IT WILL MEAN FOR YOUR CHILD: PROVOKED AND UNPROVOKED SEIZURESYour child is playing outside when his friend comes banging at the door. “Come quick!” the friend shouts. “Something’s happened to Bobby!” You run and find Bobby on the edge of the playground jerking his arms and legs and making gurgling sounds. “Was that a seizure?” you ask your physician later. “It certainly sounds like one,” she replies. “We have to be concerned that Bobby might have another one. If he does, then he has epilepsy—by definition.” If after talking to Bobby’s friend she learns that Bobby was climbing a tree, fell, and hit his head, she might answer differently. “I think Bobby had a slight concussion and a brief seizure, what we call a ‘post-traumatic seizure.’ These brief seizures after a child hits his head are not uncommon and rarely recur. I think that this is what we call a provoked seizure. I don’t believe he has epilepsy or will have epilepsy.”It is not the mere occurrence of a seizure but also the circumstances under which the seizure occurs that determine if a child is likely to have more seizures. Furthermore, the child must have two or more seizures or he has not got epilepsy.If a child has several seizures during an episode of meningitis, or after a head injury, or with diarrhea and dehydration, or with other acute “illnesses,” these seizures are termed “provoked” seizures or “symptomatic” seizures, ones that have a defined cause, just as Jane’s seizure after fainting was a “provoked” seizure. The acute brain disturbance that caused them will disappear or be cured and the seizures should not recur.Although acute conditions such as a head injury or meningitis can cause permanent damage to the brain, and that damage can later lead to “unprovoked” recurrent seizures—i.e., epilepsy—permanent damage followed later by epilepsy is not a consequence of acute “symptomatic” seizures in children.*19\208\8*

Google Bookmarks Digg Reddit del.icio.us Ma.gnolia Technorati Slashdot Yahoo My Web

Random Posts

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.